April 2018

Struck By Safety—Toolbox Talk #6

For more information about the Focus 4 Campaign and to access to all the toolbox talks in English and/or Spanish, click here.

Head Protection

The hard hat is one of the oldest, most widely used, and most important pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) on the job. However, the hard hat cannot do its job when it is not properly worn, maintained, and replaced when needed.

Actual Incident: Bob and his crew were putting on a new roof on a house. During the day, Bob was cleaning up debris when a falling hammer struck his hard hat. Although he experienced pain and discomfort, Bob did not require hospital admission.

Could this incident have been avoided?

Do you work at a job that requires you to wear a hard hat?

How do you inspect your hard hat for defects which would require your employer to replace it?

Warnings and Precautions

  • Never drill holes in the hard hat shell for ventilation purposes.
  • Always wear your hardhat with the bill facing forward.
  • Always avoid contact between the hard hat and electric wires.
  • Never use a hardhat suspension that is not intended for use with a particular shell, or one that is made by a different manufacturer.
  • Never carry or wear anything inside of your hard hat between the suspension and the shell. A clearance must be maintained between the hard hat shell and the wearer’s head for the protection system to work properly.
  • A Ball cap or other object may limit clearance and shouldn’t be worn under the hard hat.
  • Only wear products, such as winter liners or sunshades that are designed specifically to work in conjunction with hard hats. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for use.
  • Consider inspecting the hard hat daily for the following: stiffness, brittleness, fading, dullness of color, or a chalky appearance. If the shell exhibits any of these conditions or if it is obviously otherwise damaged, it should be removed from service and replaced immediately. Some hard hats need replacing after 2 years of extreme temperature exposure; others may last longer. The interior suspension should be inspected closely for cracks or tears, frayed or cut straps, loss of pliability, or other signs of wear*.

What are the hard hat practices at this site?

Have you seen any modified hard hats in use?

Are you checking and maintaining your hard hat in optimal condition?

*Reference: http://elcosh.org/document/1449/d000504/taking-care-of-your-hard-hat.html

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Struck By Safety—Toolbox Talk #5

For more information about the Focus 4 Campaign and to access to all the toolbox talks in English and/or Spanish, click here.

Working Safely Around and/or Securing Loads

What are the hazards of working around (suspended or moving) loads? Loads releasing onto workers from trucks or storage areas, materials dropped on workers while loading trucks or unstrapping loads.

What are the results? Crushed or broken limbs, head injuries, amputations, death.

What should we look for? Poorly stacked building materials, lopsided loads on trucks, loads not properly tied down, materials being lifted by cranes near work areas.

Actual Incident: A 45-year-old crane operator died while rigging a load. A tractor-trailer driver unstrapped the load to ready it for lifting. The operator climbed onto the load during rigging and it rolled off the trailer and crushed him. The tractor-trailer driver was not at a meeting earlier that day where drivers were told that their loads had to be kept strapped.

How do we prevent these results?

  • Keep workers who are not involved in loading or unloading clear of loading areas.
  • Load materials for maximum stability. Distribute weight evenly and keep materials level. Secure loads following safe and appropriate industry practices.
  • Consider having a competent person inspect incoming freight to identify those that pose serious hazards during unloading.
  • Nail 2×4 boards to the floor of cargo areas to secure equipment with wheels.
  • Make sure cargo does not restrict driver’s vision, free motion, exit from the vehicle, or access to emergency supplies.
  • Stack and store materials with no more than a 4:1 height to base ratio and keep materials back from the edge.
  • Perform rigging only if you are qualified. Choose the right equipment and inspect it prior to each use.Tag and take defective rigging equipment out of service!
  • Each day before use, slings and all fastenings and attachments shall be inspected for damage or defects by a competent person designated by the employer.

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Struck By Safety—Toolbox Talk #4

For more information about the Focus 4 Campaign and to access to all the toolbox talks in English and/or Spanish, click here.

Equipment & Falling Objects

Being Struck by Falling Objects is a leading source of construction fatalities. Even a small object falling from a height can cause serious or fatal injuries.

Here is an Example: In March 2017, a laborer was picking up debris at a construction site. A forklift was lifting a pile of lumber to the third floor next to him. The lumber was not secured and fell three stories from the forklift. One board struck an employee in the head. He was wearing a hard hat, but the incident left him with a concussion.

  1. What could have been done to prevent this incident?
  2. Are materials regularly being lifted by heavy equipment to upper levels on your worksite?
  3. If so, what do you do to protect yourself when walking through the site? What do you do to protect others?

Prevent Being Struck by Equipment or Objects

  • Loads should not be hoisted or allowed to pass over people.
  • Loads need to be secured when lifted by forklifts, cranes, or any sort of material mover.
  • Hard hats can help minimize injuries to the head and therefore also protect your spine.
  • Toe boards need to be placed on all scaffolding, unprotected sides or edges, and open elevations to protect workers below from falling materials such as lumber, brick, tools, debris, nuts and bolts, nails, screws, and equipment.
  • Materials should be stacked and secured appropriately and not leaning or ready to topple over.
  • Tools in elevated working areas need to be secured if close to any change in elevation. There are new and improved tool lanyards available.
  • Even when taking all of the above cautions, items can shift, winds can gust or change, workers can lose their grip, someone can accidently kick an object, or any number of other things can happen to allow objects to become airborne and drop to lower levels. So listen and watch as you walk the site; get off the cell phone; remove the earbuds or lower the volume of the music.

Let’s talk about this jobsite. Record notes and share with appropriate parties

  • Are elevated loading areas or zones on this project and cordoned off to restrict entry?
  • Is there any area on this site that the Controlling Contractor should be told about to eliminate a potential falling object
    exposure?

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Episode #75 of The Maryland Construction Network is an audio recording of Ro Waldron’s article, “Pick Up The Phone And Call”. The article appeared in the April 2018 edition of MCN’s Newsletter “Networked & Connected”.

The article speaks of the benefits to conducting conversations with people rather than relying solely on electronic communications. Indeed, there are advantages to be derived when speaking directly to people.

Enjoy listening. If you want to read Ro’s article, get his contact information, or read all of the other articles in MCN’s outstanding newsletter, download the April 2018 issue here.

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Episode #74 of The Maryland Construction Network is the audio recording from our April 12, 2018 Wisdom & Wine presentation “Secure Your Email Environment In Today’s Ever-Changing Threat Landscape”. Our event host Business Information Group, in conjunction with Mr. Thorston Stoeterau from Barracuda Networks, made this presentation possible.

You may download a pdf of the slideshow used in the presentation here.

Ransomware and Spear Phishing are becoming very large cyber threats to end users and are expected to reach >$1 billion in profits this year alone. Without a comprehensive security strategy in place, resource-limited small to mid-sized businesses are the ones who are more likely to (literally) pay the price.

Join Maryland Construction Network, Business Information Group & Barracuda Networks, Inc. for an affordable and informative presentation designed to give you the tools and information needed to prevent your business from becoming victim to ever-increasing business crippling cyber threats.

In this session you will learn:

  • The different types of attacks and their anatomies.
  • Why traditional tools and approaches are no longer effective.
  • How to implement a layered approach to defense.

Don’t miss this unique and affordable opportunity to learn about ever-changing cyber threats which can impact your business plus.

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OSHA Focus 4 – Struck By Safety – Toolbox Talk #3 – Work Zone Driving

Struck By Safety—Toolbox Talk #3 For more information about the Focus 4 Campaign and to access to all the toolbox talks in English and/or Spanish, click here. Work Zone Driving Drive towards ZERO crashes—Your driving actions and habits can save lives, including yours! Know the work zone signs. They are the metal plaques that inform […]

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OSHA Focus 4 – Struck By Safety – Toolbox Talk #1

Struck By Safety—Toolbox Talk #1 For more information about the Focus 4 Campaign and to access to all the toolbox talks in English and/or Spanish, click here. How Can We Be Safe Around Equipment? What are the hazards? Employees working around heavy equipment are exposed to pinch points, back-in-to, run-over, and back-over hazards when working […]

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